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colon cancer

Correcting Common Colorectal Cancer Misconceptions

Kaltura ID
1_efo3lhmq

Episode Transcript

Interviewer: Were you aware that lack of knowledge about colorectal cancer causes a significant percentage of adult deaths from colon cancer every single year? So that means just by listening to this podcast today you are going to reduce your risk of colorectal cancer.

Dr. Priyanka Kanth is from Huntsman Cancer Institute and here are the bullet points that we're going to talk about today to help inform you so you are less likely to get colorectal cancer.

Video type
Kaltura
Player ID / UI Conf ID
15403722
Podcast type
uNID
u0714617
Description

According to Dr. Priyanka Kanth, misconceptions about colorectal cancer may be the cause of a significant percentage of deaths from the disease. Educate yourself about the causes of colorectal cancer, screening, and who’s at risk—because by the time you have symptoms, it may already be too late.

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Wed, 02/01/2023 - 13:13

Why You Should Get Your Colorectal Cancer Screening at 45

Kaltura ID
1_u9aupa6f

Episode Transcript

Interviewer: It used to be 50. Now it's 45 and there's a good reason for that. Huntsman Cancer Institute and University of Utah Health says more lives can be saved if men and women who are at average risk of colorectal cancer get screened at 45 instead of 50 years old. Dr. Priyanka Kanth is from Huntsman Cancer Institute. Why the change? What happened?

Video type
Kaltura
Player ID / UI Conf ID
15403722
Podcast type
uNID
u0714617
Description

Forty-five is the new fifty, at least when it comes to screening for colorectal cancer. New guidelines from the American Cancer Society suggest patients start screening for deadly cancer earlier. Dr. Priyanka Kanth from Huntsman Cancer Institute explains why the change in the screening age and how catching cancer early can save your life.

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Wed, 02/01/2023 - 13:13

Dramatic Rise in Colorectal Cancer for People under 50

Colorectal cancer is thought to be something you’d worry about as you got older, but younger patients are developing the condition. Dr. Andrew Gawron, a gastroenterologist at University of Utah Health, explains what this means for younger adults.

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Removing Ovaries Might Increase the Risk of Colon Cancer

Kaltura ID
0_cdfsyyul

Episode Transcript

Dr. Jones: If you're having a hysterectomy for problems with your uterus, should you have your ovaries removed the same time? This is Dr. Kirtly Jones from obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Utah Healthcare, and this is The Scope.

Announcer: Covering all aspects of women's health this is the seven domains of women's health with Dr. Kirtley Jones on The Scope.

Video type
Kaltura
Player ID / UI Conf ID
15403722
Podcast type
uNID
u0031449
Description

Many women choose to have their ovaries removed during a hysterectomy. Though removing the ovaries adds little to overall risk of the surgery, it could contribute to colon cancer or other potential health problems. In this episode, Dr. Kirtly Parker Jones discusses the risks and benefits of removing the ovaries.

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Thu, 02/02/2023 - 01:59

Drug Treatment Prevents Polyps In High-Risk Cancer Patients

Kaltura ID
0_jqlisqj2

Episode Transcript

Interviewer: Stopping cancer before it even starts. We'll talk about that next on The Scope.

Announcer: Examining the latest research and telling you about the latest breakthroughs. The Science and Research Show is on The Scope.

Interviewer: I'm talking with Doctor Deb Neklason, Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator and Program Director of the Utah Genome Project. Dr. Neklason, congratulations on your recent JAMMA publication. What did the results of your clinical trials show?

Video type
Kaltura
Player ID / UI Conf ID
15403722
Podcast type
uNID
u0078916
Description

A randomized clinical trail led by Huntsman Cancer Institute investigators finds that a combinatorial chemotherapy reduces precancerous polyps by 75 percent in patients at high-risk for cancer. This advance represents the first prevention therapy against the leading cause of death, cancer of the small intestine, for patients with a genetic condition that leads to a 100 percent lifetime risk for developing cancer. Co-author of the study published in JAMA, and Utah Genome Project investigator Deb Neklason, Ph.D., explains how an investigation of families represented in the Utah Population Database identified the genetic cause of the disorder, making this work possible. She also describes how discovery of the new therapy could inform prevention strategies against other types of cancers, including sporadic colon cancer.

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Thu, 02/02/2023 - 01:59

Tracing a Family Tree to the Roots of Colon Cancer

Kaltura ID
0_6q0mv040

Episode Transcript

Interviewer: Genetic discovery is allowing a family to outlive their family history. Up next on The Scope.

Announcer: Examining the latest research and telling you about the latest breakthroughs. The Science and Research Show is on The Scope.

Interviewer: I'm talking with Deb Neklason. She's Program Director of the Utah Genome Project. Dr. Neklason, tell me about this family. What sets them apart from others?

Video type
Kaltura
Player ID / UI Conf ID
15403722
Podcast type
uNID
u0078916
Description

When scientists uncovered a genetic defect that was causing colon cancer in a large family, they were faced with the decision of what to do next. The researchers and family have developed a close, long-term relationship that has helped family members understand their condition and what they can do about it. Deb Neklason, Ph.D., program director of the Utah Genome Project tells the remarkable story, how it has impacted the family, and how researchers are connecting branches of the family tree so that extended family members also have the chance to outlive their family history.

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Thu, 02/02/2023 - 01:59

How Accurate is a Colonoscopy?

Kaltura ID
0_leo3hjl2

Episode Transcript

Announcer: Medical news and research from University of Utah physicians and specialists you can use for a happier and healthier life. You're listening to The Scope.

Host: It's been generally thought that a colonoscopy was 100% effective at preventing colorectal cancer, but new research has shown that's not necessarily the case. N. Jewel Samadder is the lead author of a recent study. He's at Huntsman Cancer Institute. What did you learn in this study?

Video type
Kaltura
Player ID / UI Conf ID
15403722
Podcast type
uNID
u0724423
Description

Until recently, physicians thought a colonoscopy was 100 percent accurate. New research from the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute shows it is not. Dr. N. Jewel Samadder talks about what the research discovered and what doctors and patients need to know to get the best result possible.

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Thu, 02/02/2023 - 01:59

Screening Guidelines May Fail to Catch 10 Percent of Colon Cancers

Kaltura ID
0_h0fw52d5

Episode Transcript

Announcer: Medical news and research from University of Utah physicians and specialists you can use for a happier and healthier life. You're listening to The Scope.

Video type
Kaltura
Player ID / UI Conf ID
15403722
Podcast type
uNID
u0724423
Description

Utah’s unique resources of genealogy and cancer data, combined with records from two major health care organizations, made it possible for researchers to determine that the current screening guidelines allow a large number of colon cancer cases to go undetected. Dr. N. Jewel Samadder, of the Huntsman Cancer Institute, discusses how the findings can affect colon cancer screening guidelines and explains that because of the state’s unique storehouses of genealogy and medical records, a study covering such a broad spectrum of the population couldn’t have happened anywhere but Utah. Samadder also discusses the future of combining records from multiple sources to provide consumers more accurate health care information.

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Thu, 02/02/2023 - 01:59